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What are inquiries and how do they affect FICO® Scores?


Credit inquiries are requests by a “legitimate business” to check your credit.
Inquiries may or may not affect FICO® Scores. Credit inquiries are classified as either “hard inquiries” or “soft inquiries”—only hard inquiries have an effect on FICO® Scores.

Soft inquiries are all credit inquiries where your credit is NOT being reviewed by a prospective lender. FICO® Scores do not take into account any involuntary (soft) inquiries made by businesses with which you did not apply for credit, inquiries from employers, or your own requests to see your credit file. Soft inquiries also include inquiries from businesses checking your credit to offer you goods or services (such as promotional offers by credit card companies) and credit checks from businesses with which you already have a credit account. If you are receiving FICO® Scores for free from a business with which you already have a credit account, there is no additional inquiry made on your credit report.

FICO® Scores take into account only voluntary (hard) inquiries that result from your application for credit. Hard inquiries include credit checks when you’ve applied for an auto loan, mortgage, credit card or other types of loans. Each of these types of credit checks count as a single inquiry. One exception occurs when you are “rate shopping”. Your FICO® Scores consider all inquiries within a reasonable shopping period for an auto, student loan or mortgage as a single inquiry.

The relative information with a hard inquiry that can be factored into FICO® Scores include:

  • Number of recently opened accounts, and proportion of accounts that are recently opened, by type of account.
  • Number of recent credit inquiries.
  • Time since recent account opening(s), by type of account.
  • Time since credit inquiry(ies).

For many people, one additional hard credit inquiry (voluntary and initiated by an application for credit) may not affect their FICO® Scores at all. For others, one additional inquiry would take less than 5 points off a FICO® Score.

Inquiries can have a greater impact, however, if you have few accounts or a short credit history. Large numbers of inquiries also mean greater risk: people with six inquiries or more in their credit files are eight times more likely to declare bankruptcy than people with no inquiries in their files.

This content is provided by FICO. © 2017 Fair Isaac Corporation. FICO is a registered trademark of Fair Isaac Corporation in the United States and other countries.